Pasalubong

Pasalubong is a Filipino term for gift/s usually from people who have been on a trip to other places or even just after a trip to the grocery. It could be anything from snacks to toys. The one who is buying the pasalubong does it out of love and expects nothing in return. So, as I’ve said it’s a gift. It doesn’t have to be expensive too. Because the idea of pasalubong is sharing your blessings and at the same time showing the person who is receiving it that you think about him/her while you travel. It is also a part of the Filipino culture.

Last month, my parents came back from their vacation from the Philippines and they bought us lots of pasalubong. I was surprised because I never expected that they’ll buy me more than 2 packs of banana chips. They bought us 2 small Purefoods corned beef, 2 packs of Sustagen chocolate drink, 10 packs of Quaker Oat cereals, a pack of Lengua (a butter cookie type), pajamas and books for my L.O., and 2 packs of Meiji Macadamia chocolate. I guess they just missed me and their grandchild a lot! 😀 lol! Aside from that, they asked me for a list of stuff that I wanted them to buy for me (will make a separate blog post about that). Like for instance, some prescription free meds. My parents know that I miss the Philippines so much and my favorite snacks are there. 🙂

How about in your culture? Do you buy pasalubong to your love ones as well?

Tita’s Banana Chips. The best banana chips ever! It’s thin and crispy.

 

Filipino children’s books!

 

Pajamas from Landmark for the little one

 

Summer Vacation Part III: Feast of St. Ignatius de Loyola

The feast of Saint Ignatius de Loyola is celebrated on July 31. Saint Ignatius is the patron saint of the soldiers, the founder of the Jesuits (Society of Jesus) and he is also one of the patron saints of Liloan Southern Leyte.

It’s not my first time to celebrate the feast of St. Ignatius de Loyola in Liloan because my mom is from there and we have relatives there as well.

Anyway, we arrived in Liloan 2 weeks before the fiesta and it was raining (July is rainy season in the Philippines) but it wasn’t that bad compared to Manila. I’m thankful because the sun shined a couple of days after the arrival so we got the chance to go for a sightseeing and swimming. Then every morning, the sound of drums and lyres woke us up-yes there’s parade everyday before the fiesta! My cousins said that they celebrate their patron saint for a week and there are lots of activities before and during the fiesta. Like for example, the Lilo-Lilo Festival and the beauty pageant.

As a girl who grew up in Manila, I find fiestas outside the city more lively and more fun because people are cooperative and care about their community.